Microsoft’s $69 billion acquisition of game developer Activision Blizzard runs into obstacles with the FTC.

Microsoft’s $69 billion acquisition of game developer Activision Blizzard runs into obstacles with the FTC.

Microsoft’s strategy to takeover leading video gaming entity Activision Blizzard has run into obstacles with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). If the federal trade commission has its way, Activision Blizzard and its line-up of hot-selling video games like “Call of Duty” and others are not to be sold to Microsoft.

The $69 billion franchise deal is to be called off. The deal is the largest of its kind in the video gaming industry and Microsoft’s largest ever. If this deal goes through, Microsoft will be in a position to wield competitors to its Xbox gaming consoles and its swiftly increasing subscription content and cloud gaming offerings.

In a complaint filed, the FTC took cognizance of Microsoft’s taking possession of and using valuable gaming content to shun competition from rival consoles. It also claims ownership over ZeniMax, the parent company of Bethesda Softworks, a reputed game developer. Microsoft decided to wield possession over several works by Bethesda, including Starfield and Redfall, in spite of promises to European antitrust authorities that it had no intention of holding back games from rival consoles.

Activision is one of the less visible top game producers in the world, which creates and publishes high-quality video games for multiple devices, including video game consoles, PCs, and smartphones. It is home to some incredible titles, including Call of Duty, World of Warcraft, Diablo, and Overwatch. The video game developer currently boasts of million active users around the world as per a FTC complaint. Activision publishes games on many devices, irrespective of producer.

If the deal were to go through, Microsoft would be in a position to destabilise the competition by manipulating Activision’s pricing, degrading Activision’s game quality, or withholding content from competitors entirely to meet its own nefarious designs and pose harm to consumers.